Category Archives: Kwik Sew

Pattern Review: Kwik Sew 3089

Kwik Sew 3089

Pattern Description: Baby Sleep Sack. I made View A, the sleeveless version.

Pattern Sizing: XS, S, M, L, XL.  I made the size M.  I made it for my three month old niece Chloe.  The medium size is for 3-6 month olds.  My parents are bringing Chloe’s and Haley’s pj’s to Madison tomorrow.  I hope they fit!

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it? Yes!  Well, except for the embroidery I added.

Were the instructions easy to follow? The instructions were great. I didn’t have any problems with them.

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern? LikesVery simple pattern with only a few pattern pieces.  It was relatively quick to sew because of it.  From start to finish it was about a 3 hour project. 

Dislikes were:

  1. I did not like the finishing for the armholes.  They instruct you to overcast the edges and then just turn it over and stitch it down.  I think a binding would look a lot nicer, but due to holiday time constraints, I just did as instructed.  It’s fine and most likely a non-sewist would not notice the finish. 
  2. The neck band is a little fiddly to attach.  Make sure you read all the way through to the end of the instructions for that section or you’ll make the same mistake I did of sewing the zipper SA’s prematurely.  It wasn’t a fatal flaw, but it would have looked nicer had I followed the letter of the law.  Live and learn I guess.

Armhole

neckband and snap tab

  

Any difficulties encountered? Aside from the neckline issue mentioned above, the only other thing I had a hard time with was the top stitching around the zipper.  The instructions tell you to stitch 1/4 in away from the zipper, I, of course, stitched too close, so it was hard to get around the pull and the end of the zipper.   My stitching is a little wonky in that area, but I don’t think anyone but a perfectionist would notice. 

Fabric Used: I used a polyester fleece from my local sewing store P&S Fabrics in Downtown NYC.  It was soft and fluffy and perfect for this sleep sack.  It will be soft against a baby’s skin and will keep Chloe really warm on those cold Madison nights.

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:  I added some hand embroidery to relieve the simplicity of the project, a little snowflake in ivory embroidery floss.  Normally I would only use 2 or 3 threads of the floss, but I really wanted it to stand out, so I used all 6 threads.

 Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others? I will definitely sew it again. I think it makes a great baby gift and you can personalize it rather easily.   I do recommend it for any sewist. Beginner’s might find the neckband a bit of a challenge, but not out of reach skill-wise if done carefully and slowly. It’s a pretty quick project compared to flannel pj’s. 

Conclusion: I love the sleep sack and am pleased to give it to my new little niece Chloe.  Hopefully I will have a picture of her in it soon.

Advertisements

Not a Pattern Review: Kwik Sew 3510

After making two flannel jammies for my niece and nephew, Thor and Katie, I took the easy route with my son Jack’s and my niece Haley’s pjs.  I made them another set of Kwik Sew 3510 knit jammies, like I did for all the kids last year.  Here’s my pattern review from back then.  Again, I did not have any issues with sizing.  And again, I constructed this almost entirely on the serger. 

I did have two things different this time around though.  I have a new tool that I wanted to use in this iteration, a stretch twin needle for the hem.  The knits I used, a plane camo from the FabricFairy.com and a red and white stripe knit that I can’t remember where I bought it, were pretty stable so I didn’t have to stabilize the hems at all.  I fiddled around with stitch length and thread tension and found that a length of 3.0 and tension of 2 was perfect for the twin needle stitch.  It made a beautiful hem.

 

When I made the sleep sack (review forthcoming) for my niece Chloe, the instructions said to top stitch the neck band SA to the body of the sack.  I loved how finished the inside looked without that SA flopping around so I used that trick for Jack’s and Haley’s knit jammies too.  It looks great!

That’s about it.  These are pretty quick and easy jammies to make.  Not a lot to say.  So let’s just look at Jack shall we (sorry no picture of Haley yet as she hasn’t received the pj’s yet)?   😉  

Merry Christmas!

I meant to post this jammie picture yesterday, but, as you can imagine, the day was busy with opening presents, putting said presents together, and cooking. 

Jammipalooza 2010 was a great success.  The kids loved their pj’s and they looked so cute in them.  See for yourselves…

L: Jack in KS3510, M: Katie in NL6638, R: Thor in S3584

I will have reviews up for these pjs later today and tomorrow.  I hope you all had a great holiday.  I’ll be back later with the dets.

On the mend…

Well folks, I’m finally on the mend.  It only took two days off of work and sleeping off some of my sleep deficit for my immune system to kick in finally. 

I kept a steady stream of movies in the dvd player and Nick Jr on the tv for Jack today while I sewed (ah the luxuries of single parenting).  But I am still super behind in my Xmas sewing.  It took me 10 straight hours of  sewing to complete the flannel pj’s for my nephew Thor.  I used Simplicity 3584, the bottom left, View C. 

Simplicity 3584

Overall it’s a decent pattern.  There was only one small drafting error that I encountered.  It was the facing, which extended far too long.  In retrospect, I could have cut it off to match the shoulder seam, but I had tunnel vision at the time and now it’s too late.  Oh well.  I think the pattern is pretty simple; there’s no collar stand after all.  But I think it’s a little too intense or long of a project for Xmas jammies.  The top has so many details that are fussy, like the collar (despite no collar stand) and the pocket.  I’m on the fence as to whether the cut on facing is time saver or not. 

The jammies are definitely cute, but a lot of work.  And with my time constraints now, I am switching gears now and using last year’s knit jammies pattern, Kwik Sew 3510.  The only change I’ll make is to lengthen the torso on the tops. 

Kwik Sew 3510

Apologies, but I can’t show you the flannel pj’s until after Xmas.  My sister might check out my blog and I want it to be a surprise. 

I hope everyone’s Xmas sewing is going well. 

PS: I am so behind on reading blogs right now.  I have over 300 waiting for me on google reader right now, at least 90 of which are saved ones on which I need to comment.  There’s just too little time in the day.

Retro Jacket

Once upon a time my dad had a corduroy jacket.  He bought it when he was stationed in Germany in 1967.  It was a dark navy blue, with a mandarin collar, and while  not too fitted, it was slim fitting.  It had front pockets at hips level and it was lined.  At one time, my mom appropriated it from him.  Then I wore it all the time in high school and then my sister wore it too.  It was worn to shreds. 

I loved that jacket.  I would like to recreate it.  The last year and a half, I have looked off and on for a pattern that fit the style details of this jacket but have been fruitless in my searches. First I looked at images on Google images to find something that looked similar.  Never found it.  Then I looked at men’s patterns in all the usual places, the big pattern companies, Simplicity, and New Look.  Couldn’t find anything that worked.  I even called upon the esteemed Peter.  I thought, “Surely he must have a pattern that fits the bill in his stash.”  Actually, it is Peter’s most recent project, the cranberry corduroy suit, that reminded me of my dad’s jacket.  Although Peter had some good ideas how to work around a regular blazer pattern, he did not have a pattern with that mandarin collar I so craved.

And then I remembered Kwik Sew.  The Kwik Sew of the famed Xmas pj’s I made last year.  So I took a gander at both their men’s and women’s jackets.  And lo and behold, there it was.  THE. PATTERN.

Enter Kwik Sew 3438 my friends.  It’s not fitted, yet is still slim fitting.  It’s simple, has the mandarin collar.  My father’s jacket didn’t have rounded jacket corners, but that’s an easy fix.  The pockets had flaps and I think were on the interior, not patch, but again, a simple enough change.  Obviously, I won’t be binding the edges, but I think this may be it!!!

It really closely resembles the jacket in my memory.  Right, Mom???

Question of the day: Do any of you have clothing from your past that you miss and want to recreate some day?  This is one of those projects for me.  Tell me about yours!

Kwik Sew 3146 Pattern Review

It’s finally finished!!!  Thor’s camp shirt.  I just posted the review at PatternReview.com.  Here it is with a few more pictures… 

Thor, God of Thunder, in his new camp shirt

 

Pattern Description:  Toddlers’ shirts have collar with collar stand, yoke, front placket with button closure, and shirt-tail hemline.  View A has long sleeves with buttoned cuffs and breast pocket.  View B has short sleeves and breast pocket.  View C has western-style yokes, long sleeves with buttoned cuffs, and front pockets with buttoned flaps.  I made view B. 

Pattern Sizing:  T1-T4 — I made a T2 for my nephew Thor; he just turned two.  It’s a little big on him, but I think that’s fine for this kind of shirt and he’s got room to grow. 

Did it look like the photo/drawing on the pattern envelope once you were done sewing with it?  YES! 

Were the instructions easy to follow?   The instructions were very easy to follow. 

What did you particularly like or dislike about the pattern?   

LIKES: I thought the collar/stand instructions were great and made for a great looking collar.  I am really proud of my first collar and stand!!!  

my FIRST collar with stand!

 

Even David Coffin thought so.  Really!  We’re FB friends and when I posted a picture of the collar and stand he commented, “Nice collar.”  I was blown away!  In my shirtmaking research I did read David Coffin’s book on shirtmaking from cover to cover.  I thought it was fantastic and it definitely helped me with this project.  The Kwik Sew method for making a clean finish on the yoke was also great.  

DISLIKES: I didn’t like the tiny seam allowances which did not allow for flat felled seams at all.  1/4 inch SA’s???  You can’t even serge them to finish them off.  I accidentally serged off part of one of the sleeves.  It was minor and I was able to fix it, but it could have been a disaster.  I ended up overcasting with my sewing machine to patch some sections. 

Fabric Used:  I bought what I thought was a plain cotton gingham fabric, but when I got it home, I noticed it had some stretch.  I just assumed it was 100% cotton because why would anyone add lycra to gingham shirting?  I just don’t understand it.  However, it didn’t really affect anything with the making of the shirt.  Because of the regularity of the print/weave of the fabric, I cut all the pattern pieces in a single layer to match up the print as much as possible.  While they were cut precisely to match, it was a little difficult to maintain the matching of the gingham at the machine.  I think it will take much more practice and maybe the use of my walking foot, but I’ll get there.  This was my first time really trying to match such a pattern. 

Pattern alterations or any design changes you made:  I didn’t make any real alterations, but I did change construction order and used some different techniques.  

I did not interface the pocket as I didn’t think it was necessary.  The instructions would have you hem the shirt before you sew the side seams, but I think that’s crazy.  I waited until after I had sewn them.  I guess I’m no longer a beginner now if I am disagreeing with pattern instructions!  On the other hand, the instructions also have you sew up the sleeves before you hem them, but it’s really hard to hem tiny little sleeves.  I didn’t think of this before I sewed them up, so I was forced to hem them after they were sewn.  But if I had sewn up the T1 size, I don’t think I could have hemmed the sleeves on the machine; I would have had to sew them by hand.  Another change I made to the pattern was to use pearl snaps instead of buttons.  I just thought it was a neater look and more child friendly.  I loved it.  And an embellishment I added was to use freezer paper stencil (tutorial here) to create a red thunderbolt on the back of the shirt for a more urban feel.  Thor’s name means God of Thunder, so it was very a propos and he loved it. 

painting over the freezer paper stencil I cut

 

finished thunderbolt (three paint layers)

 

Would you sew it again? Would you recommend it to others?  I will definitely make it again, but next time, I will add more to the seam allowances so I can make flat felled seams.  Why not?  You’ve already gone to the trouble to make a real collar and stand.  Why wouldn’t you also want flat felled seams as well?  Also next time, I will only interface half the placket as I felt it was too stiff after all the layers are sewn together.  It could have been that my interfacing was too stiff, but I still think halving the interfacing would be better.  I would definitely recommend this to anyone, even beginners, as long as they take their time and really understand the directions. 

Conclusion:  I love this pattern.  I think it makes a great and professional looking shirt due to the great collar/stand and yoke instructions.  

 

In other sewing news, I just muslined the bodice for Vogue’s DVF wrap dress knockoff, 8379.  I will start cutting out the real fabric tomorrow.  Wish me luck please.

Happy sewing everyone!

Lots of progress!

Wow, either I am getting better at this sewing thing or this is just a speedy project.  After all it is a teeny tiny little shirt.  Did I mention that it was small too?  Tonight I assembled the collar and stand.

Then I attached it.

Then I attached the sleeves and sewed up the side seams.

Thank you for all your kind comments and suggestions on my last post about the matching.  I actually feel a lot better about my matching today.  Sometimes you just need some time to get some perspective.  Right?

I changed the order of construction a little bit.  (Aren’t I all grown up now?)  The instructions said to sew the shirt hem before sewing up the side seams and I thought that was silly.  Of course, now that I am typing this, I am worrying that I got too cocky and maybe should have followed the letter of the law.  Oh well, I can’t worry about it now.   😉

I still have to have to serge the side seam SA’s, make the buttonholes, attach the buttons, and hem the sleeves and bottom of the shirt.  I actually feel pretty confident that I can do all that Friday night.  Am I nuts???

Some more pics just because I can…

check out that pattern matching with the pocket!

my FIRST collar with stand!

I do have an idea to add an embellishment to the shirt, but it’s a secret as I think my sister reads my blog sometimes.  If she doesn’t she’s in big trouble.  Hahahaha!

Happy sewing everyone!

P.S.  Carolyn pointed out to me that I neglected to mention the store that was having a great sale in NYC.  It’s P&S Fabrics on Broadway below Canal and above Worth.  I’m a dork.  What can I say?